Evaluation

GGI is one of Canada’s leading firms in the areas of program evaluation and results-based management (RBM). It has conducted many evaluations and developed evaluation and results-based management frameworks for public sector organizations and NGOs in Canada and abroad. GGI seeks to apply innovative qualitative and quantitative methodologies that provide insights into the results, relevance and cost-effectiveness of policies and programs.

GGI has established a reputation of providing timely, rigorous research in projects that range from small-scale focussed studies to very complex, large-scale evaluations. Among other achievements, GGI has adapted traditional evaluation methodologies to address the increasing range of public sector programs being delivered through third parties – whether they be other levels of government, non-government organizations or the private sector. GGI has adapted its evaluation practice to respond to the requirements of the 2009 federal government evaluation policy.

GGI’s evaluation and RBM practice covers a broad range of research-based services, including:

  • Evaluation and accountability planning
  • Evaluation studies
  • Evaluation tools and training

GGI’s multi-disciplinary team of evaluation and RBM experts includes staff and sub-contractors with experience in a wide range of public sector program areas, including:

  • Health, culture and social development programs
  • Science, energy and R&D
  • International development
  • Security and justice
  • Economic and business programs
  • Transportation and communications
  • Aboriginal and northern research
  • Economic and international trade

GGI’s experience covers many public sector organizations in both Canada and internationally, including Canadian federal, provincial and municipal governments, other governments, non-governmental and United Nations organizations.

Applied Social Research

Applied social research is what we do every day. GGI conducts research into a multitude of different issues using a variety of methods. It has specific applications, such as evaluation, but also broad applications.
For example, we have conducted surveys to assess client satisfaction, impacts and attitudes. We have conducted data analysis to answer specific questions about take-up, needs assessment and program re-design. We have conducted economic impact analyses to help client understand the return on their investment. We have conducted qualitative research (such as interviews, focus groups and case studies) to better understand program impacts, continuing/evolving needs, best practices and models of delivery.

These are all just a few examples of how applied social research can be leveraged to answer pressing questions of all kinds.